Department of Physics

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Hiranya Peiris

2018 Fred Hoyle Medal and Prize

Professor Hiranya Peiris of University College London and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm for her leading contributions to understanding the origin and evolution of cosmic structure, by pioneering an interdisciplinary approach that combines theoretical, statistical and observational cosmology, astrophysics, numerical relativity and theoretical physics.

XENON1T installation in the underground hall of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The three story building houses various auxiliary systems. The cryostat containing the LXeTPC is located inside the large water tank next to the building. Photo by Roberto Corrieri and Patrick De Perio.”

The world's largest dark matter detector, XENON1T, reaches a new level of sensitivity

The international collaboration, XENON, which includes members of Stockholm University has built the world's most sensitive detector for dark matter. After one year of data collection, the experiment has reached a greater sensitivity than ever before.

A schematic of the approach used to capture water dynamics on the ultrafast timescale. If one were able to photograph the molecules in real space with different exposure times, the image would become gradually blurry because of the motion of the molecules. This is done with x-ray scattering in the so-called reciprocal space, where the diffraction pattern is gradually smoother for longer pulse durations.  (Image credits: Fivos Perakis/Stockholm University)

The Ultrafast Dance of Liquid Water

It is normally considered that water molecules in the liquid state move randomly on ultrafast timescales due to thermal fluctuations. Researchers at Stockholm University have now discovered an unexpected correlated motion in water dynamics on a sub-100 femtoseconds timescale.